Michael Massaia

Michael Massaia is one of an ever-shrinking group of photographers who still strictly use old-school methods. In our modern, digital, quick-fix world, it’s refreshing to come across a photographer with a honed process and an abundance of patience and skill.

For Afterlife, Michael used 11″x14″, 8″x10″ and 4″x5″ view cameras coupled with traditional black and white film… More

Michael Massaia

For Chinatown Nights, Michael used 11″x14″, 8″x10″ and 4″x5″ view cameras coupled with traditional black and white film to capture the highest possible resolution and dynamic range. After the image has been captured and the film developed, Michael hand-makes Platinum/Palladium prints utilizing a unique damp processing technique he developed. More

Anthony Kurtz

I recently read The Road by Cormac McCarthy and while immersed in the story of post apocalyptic America, I ran across the photography of Anthony Kurtz. When I looked through this series, I couldn’t believe the similarity to the images that McCarthy was conjuring in my head. Serendipitous that while reading the book I would stumble upon such a perfect compliment to it… More

Tribute to Banality

Photographers tend to showcase their best work. This film is an attempt to do the opposite – to create something out of those images I usually skip when browsing through my photo library: bland, boring images with no discernible subject or meaning. More

Nightlines

Nightlines was shot in Ørestaden near Copenhagen. Ørestaden has turned into the Manhattan of Denmark, with an array of new architecture rising. This series was shot along the metro lines and aims to place emphasis on some of these recently built structures. More