Grégoire A. Meyer is an Award-winning Artist currently based in London.
Chen Chen is a University Fellow in creative writing at Syracuse University, where he also serves as Poetry Editor for Salt Hill. His work has appeared or is forthcoming in Poetry, The Massachusetts Review, Crab Orchard Review, Tupelo Quarterly, Connotation Press, Split This Rock (Poem of the Week) and Nepantla: A Journal Dedicated to Queer Poets of Color, among other places. He has received fellowships from Kundiman, Tent: Creative Writing, and the Saltonstall Foundation.
Carl Phillips is the author of twelve collections of poetry and two collections of essays, the most recent of which is The Art of Daring: Risk, Restlessness, Imagination (Graywolf Press, 2014). His honors, among many others, include the Kingsley Tufts Award, the Theodore Roethke Foundation Memorial Prize and the Thom Gunn Award for Gay Male Poetry. He has four times been named a finalist for The National Book Award.
Alaina Symanovich is a graduate student pursuing her MA in creative writing from Penn State University. Her work has appeared or is forthcoming in Word Riot, Switchback, Skin to Skin, and other journals.
Paul Pickering grew up in Selma, Alabama. He earned an M.A. in English from the University of Alabama at Birmingham and an M.F.A in Poetry from the University of Oregon. He currently lives in Tunbridge, Vermont.
Daniel DeVaughn is the executive editor of the arts journal Cumulus, as well as the co-curator of the The Daily Dive, an online forum for the exchange of literature, music and visual art. He holds an MFA from the University of Oregon, and has received fellowships from Sewanee, the Norman Mailer Writer's Workshop, and the Vermont College of the Fine Arts. His poems have most recently appeared in The Nashville Review and Fogged Clarity.
Bruce Smith is the author of six collections of poems, most recently, Devotions (University of Chicago, 2011), which was nominated for both the National Book Award and the National Book Critics Circle Award, and won the Poetry Society of America's William Carlos Williams Award. His fourth book, The Other Lover (University of Chicago, 2000) was a finalist for the National Book Award and the Pulitzer Prize. His poems have appeared in Poetry, The New Yorker, The Best American Poetry Anthology, The Nation, The New Republic, The Paris Review, The Partisan Review, The American Poetry Review, and many other journals. Essays and reviews of his have appeared in Harvard Review, Boston Review and Newsday. He has been a recipient of a Guggenheim fellowship as well as twice receiving grants from the National Endowment of the Arts and the Massachusetts Foundation for the Arts. This October, Smith was named a Rome Prize Fellow at the American Academy in Rome.
Marc Petersen is a poet and photographer living in Santa Clara, CA. His work has appeared in Narrative, The Nebraska Review, The Georgia Review, The Sun, and elsewhere.
Bonnie Prince Billy, otherwise known as Will Oldham, is a musician and actor living in Louisville, Kentucky. Since 1993, he has released over twenty albums as Palace Brothers, Palace Music, Palace Songs, and the pseudonym under which he has recorded for the past fifteen years, Bonnie “Prince” Billy. As an actor, Oldham has appeared in the films Eden, Pioneer, New Jerusalem, Junebug, Wendy and Lucy, and Old Joy, among others.
Keith S. Wilson is an Affrilachian Poet, Cave Canem fellow, graduate of the Callaloo Creative Writing Workshop, and recipient of a Bread Loaf scholarship. His work has appeared or is forthcoming in American Letters & Commentary, 32 Poems, Cider Press Review, Anti-, Muzzle, Mobius, and The Dead Mule School of Southern Literature. His poetry has been nominated for a Pushcart Prize and Best of the Net award.
Daniel Anderson’s work has appeared in Poetry, The Kenyon Review, New England Review, The Yale Review, The Hudson Review, Harper’s, The New Republic, The Southern Review, The Sewanee Review, The Best American Poetry and Southwest Review among other places. He has published three books of poetry, The Night Guard at the Wilberforce Hotel (John Hopkins University Press), Drunk in Sunlight (Johns Hopkins University Press) and January Rain (Story Line Press), and edited The Selected Poems of Howard Nemerov (Swallow Press/Ohio University Press). His honors include a Pushcart Prize as well as fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Bogliasco Foundation. He teaches in the Creative Writing Program at the University of Oregon.
Michael T. Young’s fourth collection, The Beautiful Moment of Being Lost, can be purchased from the publisher: Poets Wear Prada. His chapbook, Living in the Counterpoint (Finishing Line Press), received the 2014 Jean Pedrick Chapbook Award. He received a fellowship from the New Jersey State Council on the Arts and the Chaffin Poetry Award. His work has appeared in numerous print and online journals including Edison Poetry Review, Fogged Clarity, Off the Coast, The Potomac Review, and The Raintown Review. His work also appears in the anthologies Phoenix Rising, Chance of a Ghost, In the Black/In the Red and is forthcoming in Rabbit Ears: TV Poems. He lives with his wife and children in Jersey City, New Jersey.
Jessa Heath earned her M.F.A. from the University of Oregon. She is a recipient of the Karen Jackson Ford Poetry Prize, an Oregon Literary Arts Fellowship, and an M.F.A. Scholarship from the Sewanee Writers’ Conference. She currently teaches writing at New England College and lives on a mountain in rural New Hampshire.
Will Oldham is a musician and actor living in Louisville, Kentucky. Since 1993, he has released over twenty albums as Palace Brothers, Palace Music, Palace Songs, and the pseudonym under which he has recorded for the past fifteen years, Bonnie “Prince” Billy. As an actor, Oldham has appeared in the films Eden, Pioneer, New Jerusalem, Junebug, Wendy and Lucy, and Old Joy, among others.
Scott Hightower is the award-winning author of four books of poetry and Hontanares, a bi-lingual (Spanish-English) collection (Devenir, Madrid, 2012). In 2008, Hightower's work garnered a prestigious Barnstone Translation Prize. Besides reviewing poetry for Fogged Clarity, he is a contributing editor to The Journal and the editor of the bi-lingual anthology Women Rowing: Mujeres A Los Remos (Mantis Editores, 2102). He is adjunct faculty at NYU. Hightower, a native of central Texas, lives and works in New York and sojourns in Spain.
Stephen Massimilla is a poet, critic, professor, and painter. His co-authored book, Cooking with the Muse, is forthcoming from Tupelo Press. His latest book, The Plague Doctor in His Hull-Shaped Hat, was selected in the Stephen F. Austin State University Press Prize contest. He has received the Bordighera Poetry Prize for Forty Floors from Yesterday; the Grolier Prize for Later on Aiaia; a Van Rensselaer Award, selected by Kenneth Koch; an Academy of American Poets Prize; and multiple Pushcart Prize nominations. His volume Almost a Second Thought was runner-up for the Salmon Run National Poetry Book Award, selected by X.J. Kennedy. Massimilla has recent work in AGNI, American Literary Review, Barrow Street, Bellingham Review, Chelsea, Colorado Review, Denver Quarterly, Epoch, Fiction Fix, The Literary Review, Marlboro Review, Paterson Literary Review, Provincetown Arts, The Southern Poetry Review, Tampa Review, and many other journals and anthologies. He holds an M.F.A. and Ph.D. from Columbia University and teaches literary modernism, among other subjects, at Columbia University and the New School.
Robert Wrigley has published nine collections of poetry, the most recent of which is Anatomy of Melancholy (Penguin, 2013). His poems have appeared in many journals, including Poetry, The Atlantic, Barrow Street, and The New Yorker, and were included in the 2003 and 2006 editions of Best American Poetry. Wrigley’s honors and awards include fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Idaho State Commission on the Arts, and the Guggenheim Foundation, as well as the Kingsley Tufts Poetry Award, the J. Howard and Barbara M.J. Wood Prize, the Frederick Bock Prize from Poetry magazine, the Wagner Award from the Poetry Society of America, the Theodore Roethke Award from Poetry Northwest, and six Pushcart Prizes. From 1987 until 1988 he served as the state of Idaho's writer-in-residence.
Jeremy Dulac is a filmmaker working out of Detroit.
Chris Bathgate has released several albums, including the highly acclaimed Salt Year and 2007's A Cork Tale Wake. In addition to his work as a solo artist, Bathgate is a centerpiece of the collaborative project, Skullls.
Michael McDermit is an artist living in Oregon. He is a contributing member of the My Idea of Fun artist collective founded in Johnstown, Pennsylvania, and currently teaches writing and literature at the University of Oregon.