David Dodd Lee has published eight collections of poetry, the most recent of which is Animalities (Four Way Books, 2014). His poems have recently appeared in Guernica, Field, Gulf Coast, Blackbird, and The Nation, among other journals. Lee teaches creative writing, visual art, and literature at Indiana University South Bend, where he also serves as editor-in-chief of the university’s 42 Miles Press.
J. Scott Brownlee is the author of Requiem for Used Ignition Cap, a finalist for the National Poetry Series and winner of the 2015 Orison Poetry Prize. He's also the author of the prize-winning chapbooks Highway or Belief (2013 Button Poetry Prize), Ascension (2014 Robert Phillips Prize), and On the Occasion of the Last Old Camp Meeting in Llano County (2015 Tree Light Books Prize). He lives in Philadelphia and is a core faculty member for Brooklyn Poets.
Matt Rader is the author of Desecrations (McClelland and Stewart 2016). The author of three previous collections of poetry, and the book of stories, What I Want to Tell Goes Like This, his work has appeared in journals and magazines across North America, Europe, and Australia. He teaches Creative Writing in the Department of Creative Studies at the University of British Columbia Okanagan. He lives in Kelowna, BC.
Maren Klemp is a fine art photographer living and working in Oslo, Norway. She studied Photography under professor Robert Meyer at Robert Meyer Kunsthøgskole in Oslo, and has accrued years of experience in the field of fine art photography since.
Christopher S. Bell has been writing and releasing literary and musical works through the Johnstown, Pennslyvania-based art collective My Idea of Fun since 2008. His sound projects include Emmett and Mary, Technological Epidemic, C. Scott and the Beltones, and Fine Wives. Bell's work has recently been published in The Madison Review, Red Rock Review, Quail Bell Magazine, Commonline Journal, Mobius, Gesture, Crack the Spine, Foliate Oak, The Gambler, and Eclectica, among others.  He is also a contributor to Entropy.
James Kimbrell was born in Jackson, Mississippi in 1967. He has published three volumes of poetry: Smote (2015), My Psychic (2006), and The Gatehouse Heaven (1998), and was co-translator of Three Poets of Modern Korea: Yi Sang, Hahm Dong-Seon, and Choi Young-Mi (2002), all with Sarabande Books. His work has appeared in magazines such as Poetry, Ploughshares, Field, and Best American Poetry, 2012. He has been the recipient of the Discovery / The Nation Award, a Whiting Writer’s Award, the Ruth Lilly Fellowship, the Bess Hokin Prize from Poetry magazine, and a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts. He lives in Tallahassee where he is a professor in the creative writing program at Florida State University.
Matthew Nienow is a poet and ship builder living in Port Townsend, Washington. His first collection of poems, House of Water will be released by Alice James Books later this year. His poems have appeared in Poetry, New England Review, Southwest Review, Narrative and Crazyhorse, among many other journals. His work has twice been anthologized in Best New Poets (2007, 2012) and has earned him awards and fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Elizabeth George Foundation, and Artist Trust. He was named a 2013 Ruth Lilly Fellow by the Poetry Foundation.
Rose McLarney has published two collections of poems, Its Day Being Gone (Penguin Books, 2014) and The Always Broken Plates of Mountains (Four Way Books, 2012). Its Day Being Gone was a 2013 National Poetry Series winner. She has been awarded fellowships by the MacDowell Colony, Bread Loaf and Sewanee Writers’ Conferences, and Warren Wilson College; and won the Fellowship of Southern Writers’ New Writing Award for Poetry and Alligator Juniper’s 2011 National Poetry Prize. Her work has appeared in publications including The Kenyon Review, The Southern Review, New England Review, Missouri Review, Green Mountains Review, and dozens of other journals. She earned her MFA from Warren Wilson's MFA Program for Writers and is currently an Assistant Professor of Creative Writing at Auburn University, and the Poetry Editor of The Southern Humanities Review.
Matt Rader is the author of Desecrations (McClelland and Stewart 2016). The author of three previous collections of poetry, and the book of stories, What I Want to Tell Goes Like This, his work has appeared in journals and magazines across North America, Europe, and Australia. He teaches Creative Writing in the Department of Creative Studies at the University of British Columbia Okanagan. He lives in Kelowna, BC.
Paisley Rekdal is the author of a book of essays, a memoir, and four books of poetry. Her most recent collection of poems, Animal Eye, was a finalist for the 2013 Kingsley Tufts Prize, the Balcones Prize and winner of the UNT Rilke Prize. Winner of a Guggenheim Fellowship, the Amy Lowell Poetry Traveling Fellowship, a Village Voice Writers on the Verge Award, an NEA Fellowship, two Pushcart Prizes, the University of Georgia Press’ Contemporary Poetry Series Award and a Fulbright Fellowship, Rekdal's poems and essays have appeared or are forthcoming in The New York Times Magazine, American Poetry Review, The Kenyon Review, Poetry, The New Republic, Tin House, in two editions of the Best American Poetry series and on National Public Radio. Her next book of poems, Imaginary Vessels, will be published by Copper Canyon Press in Autumn 2016.
Michael McDermit is a writer and musician living in Los Angeles. He received his MFA from the University of Oregon, where he also served as the writing instructor for the Oregon Young Scholars' Program. He is a contributing member of the My Idea of Fun artist collective that is based out of his flood-famous hometown of Johnstown, Pennsylvania, and currently teaches writing to underserved college students in South L.A..
James Kimbrell was born in Jackson, Mississippi in 1967. He has published three volumes of poetry: Smote (2015), My Psychic (2006), and The Gatehouse Heaven (1998), and was co-translator of Three Poets of Modern Korea: Yi Sang, Hahm Dong-Seon, and Choi Young-Mi (2002), all with Sarabande Books. His work has appeared in magazines such as Poetry, Ploughshares, Field, and Best American Poetry, 2012. He has been the recipient of the Discovery / The Nation Award, a Whiting Writer’s Award, the Ruth Lilly Fellowship, the Bess Hokin Prize from Poetry magazine, and a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts. He lives in Tallahassee where he is a professor in the creative writing program at Florida State University.